Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#2034794 - 10/27/18 10:15 AM What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
Well it was like having coffee with your Yale-educated super model ex-wife, then returning home to your meth-shooting, TV-guide reading current wife ...

it was bittersweet to the max.
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2034796 - 10/27/18 10:36 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
DCHawk1 Online   shocked
Proudly Derivative.

Registered: 01/29/07
Loc: District of Columbia
You left out the part about how, when she left, she tried to ease her conscience by setting you up with her ex-con former sister-in-law, who kept calling you a sniveling, deplorable jagoff and then demanded that you let her live with you for four years.


Good stuff.
_________________________
Doodie is not collective; it is personal

Top
#2034852 - 10/29/18 10:24 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
When he came to Kansas City before the election in 2008 he spoke at the WWI memorial. The day before the event my youngest daughter asked if we could go hear him speak. We got there more than an hour before the speech and there was a line over a mile long going into the security gates. With about 10 minutes to go there was no way to get everyone through security so they told us to just run up over the hill and stand outside the fence. She was 11 then and I put her on my shoulders so she could see him on the stage. Ten years later she still thinks that is one of the greatest things we ever did together.
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
#2034857 - 10/29/18 10:57 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
Great story, park! So hopefully she saw what this country was and still can be and is not growing up to believe it's always been a cesspool of ignorance, hate, bigotry, lying and voter suppression.

I got there 45 minutes before they even opened the doors ... lines around six city blocks. Didn't know if I'd make it in but even if I hadn't just the shared experience of being with a bunch of people who were about to reconnect with decency, intelligence and basic humanity would have been worth it. Unfortunately, I missed getting into the main event by about 30 people and was part of 300 in the overflow room in the school cafeteria. We were able to listen but not see. But just before the event started, damned if Tammy Baldwin, Tony Evers ... and Obama his own self stopped by. I was maybe 15 feet from him. He didn't speak long but god it did this old despairing heart good. People walked out of there on a cloud. Now, let's hope African Americans get out and vote.


Edited by kellyfenton (10/29/18 11:00 AM)
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2034858 - 10/29/18 11:00 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
DCHawk1 Online   shocked
Proudly Derivative.

Registered: 01/29/07
Loc: District of Columbia
just the shared experience of being with a bunch of people who were about to reconnect with decency, intelligence and basic humanity would have been worth it.

In all seriousness: does it strike at all as strange that you'd need to go to a political event -- a campaign event, moreover -- to have that experience?
_________________________
Doodie is not collective; it is personal

Top
#2034859 - 10/29/18 11:11 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: DCHawk1]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
Originally Posted By: DCHawk1
just the shared experience of being with a bunch of people who were about to reconnect with decency, intelligence and basic humanity would have been worth it.

In all seriousness: does it strike at all as strange that you'd need to go to a political event -- a campaign event, moreover -- to have that experience?



"Need" has nothing to do with it. There are lots of apolitical events that have good messages and happy crowds in attendance. But to have that experience in a political crowd is unique in these days of grievance politics. Maybe that's why the man is still beloved. Are you saying this should be avoided in politics?
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
#2034860 - 10/29/18 11:21 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
I didn't NEED to go to that event any more than I need to go to a concert, where I can feel equally transported. I also feel inspired when I canvass door to door every weekend and have conversations with people, both those who are as despondent and gobsmacked as I feel and those who are turned off by politics in general but are willing to be talked into at least a glimmer of hope. I guess I'm just glad I'm not so cynical that I can't be moved to despair while still holding on to hope. And giving half a [censored] about today's state of affairs is hardly a pathology. It's more of a civic duty.


Edited by kellyfenton (10/29/18 11:35 AM)
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2034861 - 10/29/18 02:34 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: parkhawk3319]
DCHawk1 Online   shocked
Proudly Derivative.

Registered: 01/29/07
Loc: District of Columbia
Originally Posted By: parkhawk3319
Originally Posted By: DCHawk1
just the shared experience of being with a bunch of people who were about to reconnect with decency, intelligence and basic humanity would have been worth it.

In all seriousness: does it strike at all as strange that you'd need to go to a political event -- a campaign event, moreover -- to have that experience?



"Need" has nothing to do with it. There are lots of apolitical events that have good messages and happy crowds in attendance. But to have that experience in a political crowd is unique in these days of grievance politics. Maybe that's why the man is still beloved. Are you saying this should be avoided in politics?


Kinda.

This is indicative of acceptance of the total state. These are not characteristics or sentiments or desires that should, in my mind, be associated with politics generally. I find it weird that so many in our country do so -- whether we're talking about those who see former president as the last bastion of human decency (thereby glossing over his own frailties) or those who see the current president as anything more than a repugnant charlatan nevertheless elected to oversee a massive and overreaching Leviathan.

I suppose that's the difference between the libertarian right and the traditionalist left. I find politics fascinating, but find politicians completely uninteresting and, moreover, unworthy of my interest.
_________________________
Doodie is not collective; it is personal

Top
#2034862 - 10/29/18 02:37 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
DCHawk1 Online   shocked
Proudly Derivative.

Registered: 01/29/07
Loc: District of Columbia
Originally Posted By: kellyfenton
I didn't NEED to go to that event any more than I need to go to a concert, where I can feel equally transported. I also feel inspired when I canvass door to door every weekend and have conversations with people, both those who are as despondent and gobsmacked as I feel and those who are turned off by politics in general but are willing to be talked into at least a glimmer of hope. I guess I'm just glad I'm not so cynical that I can't be moved to despair while still holding on to hope. And giving half a [censored] about today's state of affairs is hardly a pathology. It's more of a civic duty.


It's only a civic duty if you start with the idea that the state is what matters most in our society. I don't. And my interest in it at all is principally related to my desire to see it matter even less.
_________________________
Doodie is not collective; it is personal

Top
#2034863 - 10/29/18 02:40 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
I guess I don't see it as either/or. That civic-mindedness or finding meaning away from politics are mutually exclusive. Now that I'm engaged in it, I feel a deeper sense of purpose and commitment and am learning how it affects people's lives. TRUMP affects people's lives in meaningful ways, especially those who already felt disenfranchised. That said, it certainly cannot be the end all/be all to life.


Edited by kellyfenton (10/29/18 02:42 PM)
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2034864 - 10/29/18 03:01 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
DCHawk1 Online   shocked
Proudly Derivative.

Registered: 01/29/07
Loc: District of Columbia
And I don't disagree with you that it should not be an either or. But, in many ways, it is.

Tocqueville described the differences between the United States and France as hinging, in large part, on the Americans' rejection of the state as anything more meaningful than a necessary means to a specific end; and the related abundance of civic organizations -- churches, clubs, fraternal organizations, etc.

The state -- not Democrats, not Republicans, mind you, accepts no competitors to its authority -- and therefore relegates these once critical civic organizations either irrelevant or to the dustbin of history. All things must be unified and equitable under the state. Therefore, for example, an exception cannot be made for the Little Sisters of the Poor, who believe that they should not have a legal obligation to provide birth control to their sisters and employees.

Do not-state civic organizations serve any purpose any longer other than to promote feelings of contentedness or to amplify the reach of the state?


Edited by DCHawk1 (10/29/18 03:01 PM)
_________________________
Doodie is not collective; it is personal

Top
#2034868 - 10/29/18 05:56 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: DCHawk1]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
Acceptance of the total state is like acceptance of gravity. Ignore or deny it's existence at your own peril. In a country of 250M people with the world's largest economy there will be a large and complex "state". To think otherwise is akin to thinking you are going to walk to the edge of the roof and fly.

Few expect the president to be the last bastion of decency and civility, but to expect them to at least act like a potty trained grown up really isn't much of a bar. We should be able to expect an individual elected to public office to act like an ethical and moral human being. And when they don't it is reasonable for the adults among us to object and object and object. Because when the public/political leaders resort to pandering to our worst and most base impulses it emboldens the worst/sickest among us to act upon those. Deny that at civil society's peril.

Seeing a president for the first time is a big thing for a kid. I can still remember driving through Independence MO on a Sunday after church when I was 4 years old. As we passed an old guy on the sidewalk my dad slowed down and rolled down his window and yelled "hey, Harry". All us kids in the car waved to Truman and he smiled and waved back. Hardly the last bastion of ethics there, but it was still cool as a kid to say I saw the president walk ( with the exception of a couple of secret service guys half a block behind him) by himself around the town square. Unworthy of my interest? I guess I think humans in general are at least worthy of each other's interest and empathy to some degree.

So couch this all in the light of "disinterested outside party looking in" if you want. But remember these people control the function of the world and society your daughter will live in after you are gone. Either you will have expended some effort towards making it a better place for her or not.

Now if you will excuse me there is more tiny bashing to be done.
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
#2034890 - 10/31/18 06:23 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
Yes but it explains how you would come to believe they’re all the same and that voter suppression would rate a meh.
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2034908 - 10/31/18 02:21 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: DCHawk1]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
What is this "birth control" of which you speak and the Littleminded Sisters of the Prude so dearly object to?

Do you believe an employer should be able to override an employee's doctor' in their health directive due to religious beliefs of the employer?

Do healthcare insurers as a matter of course include estrogen therapy as something they pay for or is that extra to add it?

If I am a Jehovah's Witness should I be able to exclude blood transfusions from my employees healthcare benefits? How would I do that?

If I own the health insurance company and I think paying for the blood transfusion when ordered by a doctor has a good cost/benefit payout for me in a business sense and the doctor feels it is in the best healthcare interests of the patient/policyholder, why should the employer be able to get between me and my client/policyholder and their doctor and selectively take that out of my standard policy coverage due to religious beliefs which may not be held by the insurer, policyholder or doctor?

When I pay my employees a wage is the money theirs or mine still?

Did they earn it by virtue of their work or did I give it to them as a gift for being good workers?

When I pay for benefits for my employees as a way to keep them happy and healthy and engaged as workers, do I own those benefits or do they?

Do I get to keep my match of their 401K when they leave? Do I get any say in how they spend the 401K match contribution?

If I think alcohol is immoral should I be able to keep my employees from using their wages to buy it?

Does the employer's "religious freedom" take precedent over the employee's freedom from religion by virtue of the transference of wages? Did the employer buy the employee's freedom in the transaction?

....so many questions....
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
#2034967 - 11/02/18 03:51 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
KUCO_VOC Offline
KU1980

Registered: 05/22/08
Loc: Denver, CO
Obama in Aurora CO was the same uplifting emotion along with my daughter years back. Cold as hell and the Blues Travelers kept us entertained until he choppered in from the Air Force location nearby. Full house. No paid audience. Will never have any regrets for attending.

Trump deplorables will never say the same.
_________________________
Kansas football will rise again (Coach Don Fambrough style, that is)!

Top
#2035122 - 11/05/18 09:03 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
tophawk87 Offline
John Brown

Registered: 03/19/05
Loc: Dallas, TX
As they say here in Texas, "Obama is all hat... and no cattle." Lot's of soaring rhetoric, very little results. He had 8 years to become a transformational President, but simply fell into the habit of blaming Republicans for every speed bump he ran into.
_________________________
"Wise men still seek Him..."

Top
#2035201 - 11/06/18 12:47 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: tophawk87]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
I agree, he looks better every day don't he?
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
#2035208 - 11/06/18 01:53 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: parkhawk3319]
KUCO_VOC Offline
KU1980

Registered: 05/22/08
Loc: Denver, CO
Originally Posted By: parkhawk3319
I agree, he looks better every day don't he?
I agree that a President who makes me feel like I live in a sh*thole country IS making it all better. Thank god for my coal stoking furnace...
_________________________
Kansas football will rise again (Coach Don Fambrough style, that is)!

Top
#2035274 - 11/07/18 11:20 AM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
kellyfenton Offline
Max Falkenstien

Registered: 04/19/03
We need coal to forge the musket balls that will ultimately save us from the Caravaners.
_________________________
I apologize if the above post offended anyone in a wheelchair.

Top
#2035280 - 11/07/18 01:48 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: kellyfenton]
KUCO_VOC Offline
KU1980

Registered: 05/22/08
Loc: Denver, CO
Originally Posted By: kellyfenton
We need coal to forge the musket balls that will ultimately save us from the Caravaners.
I still don't know what is wrong with letting Dodge Grand Caravaners into Texas. We could confiscate their $30,000.00 auto until their asylum has been granted.
_________________________
Kansas football will rise again (Coach Don Fambrough style, that is)!

Top
#2035293 - 11/07/18 04:18 PM Re: What seeing Obama in Milwaukee was like [Re: KUCO_VOC]
parkhawk3319 Offline
Wilt Chamberlain

Registered: 03/24/04
Loc: Bohemia
After we confiscate them we could sell them to the old farts from the midwest who now live in Arizona.

We should take the cocaine out of the frame first, no sense in wasting good coke on old people.

I'm with you, let's let them come in and take all of their stuff and then send 'em back to their shitholecountries.

Make Americans Grifters Again!
_________________________
Well, I was born to have adventure, so I just followed up the steps

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >

Preview